The Rise of Anti-Capitalism

A new formidable technology infrastructure.

 

Jeremy Rifkin determined that technologies could improve our economy in such a manner, that we’d call it the third industrial revolution. In fact, he concluded that the economists had never really anticipated the way modern technologies would bring the marginal cost of productions so low. Those changes are closely observed by industry watchers today as they’re looking to offer services and products of higher-end ensuring large enough profit margins.

Rifkin is also emphasizing on “a new formidable technology infrastructure” that could push the phenomena a little bit further called the Internet of Things, by connecting objects digitally allowing them to communicate to each other’s properly to improve decisions, gaining enormous time and energy, lowering marginal cost of production. He’s pointing that those technologies can have a positive aspect on social commons as they will critically improve collaboration and interdependence towards universal goals.

Read more here

Fliike, let’s get physical

Fliike by Smiirl is a simple yet very smart device allowing physical shop to interact with their community by physically displaying their Facebook page’s likes.

So physical it’s not displayed via a interactive screen but flipping numbers. So smart.

Sold out! Obviously. Can’t wait for the next production run!

More info here.

Bluetooth Low Energy Explorer Tool

Bluetooth Low Energy is all about services and attributes. Exploring these attributes is an interesting way to gain more insight in how a device works and is invaluable for testing. In order to make this process more comfortable a testing tool is invaluable. Hence the BTLE-explorer was born.

BTLE-explorer is a cross-platform tool (OSX and Linux tested, Windows should be easy to add) written in python and using the Bluegiga BGLib interface for accessing Bluetooth Low Energy. The Bluegiga BGLib interface is exposed over USB-Serial (USB CDC) and is used by the tool as a serial device, making the code independent of the native Bluetooth stack of the operating system. This requires a Bluegiga BLE112 based device like the productize BLE112 Test Device or the Bluegiga BLED112 running the Bluegiga BGLib USB CDC stack.

Productize Bluetooth Low Energy Test Device

Productize Bluetooth Low Energy Test Device

On startup BTLE-Explorer goes into “collect” mode where it just listens for Bluetooth Low Energy advertisements. This allows you to find devices to connect to, or capture data encapsulated into advertisements.

 

BTLE-explorer in collect mode

BTLE-explorer in collect mode

Here the collect mode received an advertisement from two Productize ambient Light Sensor prototypes. The advertisement data contains iBeacon style data. One of the devices seems to be in a dark place 🙂

Let’s try to connect to a device. I’m going to use the cute TI Sensor Tag to demonstrate this. After enabling the device it is promptly discovered.

TI Sensor Tag found

TI Sensor Tag found

Double-clicking the device sets up a connection, and promptly does a primary service discovery.

Services discovered

Services discovered

After each service is discovered it automatically retrieves all attributes for all services. This may take a few seconds, which BTLE-explorer will indicate by means of the busy cursor.

Double-clicking on a service shows the associated attributes for the service.

IR Temperature sensor attributes

IR Temperature sensor attributes

Read an attribute by double-clicking on it, or right-click and select read for the service to read all of them one-by-one.

Attributes read

Attributes read

The temperature is decoded by an attribute specific piece of code. 0.00 seems to be incorrect though. Let’s enable the sensor and read the value again. Right-click on attribute 40 to be able to enable the sensor. An attribute specific dialog is shown.

Enable

Enable

Let’s enable the sensor and double-click the Sensor Data again.

Temperature

Temperature

To be automatically notified of the temperature every second, the sensor supports notification. Enable this by writing the Client Characteristic Configuration and enabling notification, again using an attribute specific dialog.

Enable notification

Enable notification

With notification enabled the temperature field in the Data attribute will be updated every second. This is made visible by the background of the value field changing to green every time the value changes.

Temperature updated by a notification

Temperature updated by a notification

This works similarly for the other services, e.g. for the Simple Key service.

Button press notification

Button press notification

Here I am pressing the button 1 on the Sensor Tag, which is notified nicely.

This tool is one of the tools used internally at Productize for working on BTLE enabled devices. If you want to give it a try yourself the full code is available at https://github.com/productize/BTLE-explorer. If you find this tool useful, don’t hesitate to drop me a message!

Thirty (Plus) Ways The Internet of Things is Changing The World

A brilliant post by Daniel Castro about the “Internet of Things” summarizes the sectors impacted by the ongoing revolution.

From health to transportation through consumer convenience and agriculture, this post gives a clear view on how wide the impact will be.

Excerpt :

“The “Internet of Things” refers to the concept that the Internet is no longer just a global network for people to communicate with one another using computers, but it is also a platform for devices to communicate electronically with the world around them. The result is a world that is alive with information as data flows from one device to another and is shared and reused for a multitude of purposes. Harnessing the potential of all of this data for economic and social good will be one of the primary challenges and opportunities of the coming decades.
A combination of technologies, including low-cost sensors, low-power processors, scalable cloud computing, and ubiquitous wireless connectivity, has enabled this revolution. Increasingly companies are using these technologies to embed intelligence and sensing capabilities in their products, thereby allowing everyday objects to sense, learn from, and interact with, their environment. Some of these devices engage in machine-to-machine communication. For example, sensors on the roadway electronically alert cars to potential hazards, and the smart grid sends dynamic electricity pricing data to home appliances in order to optimize power consumption. Other devices communicate information to their users, either directly through the product itself or indirectly through a web browser on a PC or mobile device. For example, decision support systems on farms may combine data on soil conditions from environmental sensors with historic and future pricing and weather data to produce recommendations to farmers on how to plant and fertilize particular plots of land.”

Read full article here.

About the Author
Daniel Castro is a Senior Analyst with the Information Technology and Innovation Foundation and Director of the Center for Data Innovation. Mr. Castro writes and speaks on a variety of issues related to information technology and internet policy, including privacy, security, intellectual property, internet governance, e-government, and accessibility for people with disabilities. His work has been quoted and cited in numerous media outlets, including The Washington Post, The Wall Street Journal, NPR, USA Today, Bloomberg News, and Businessweek. In 2013, Mr. Castro was named to FedScoop’s list of “Top 25 most influential people under 40 in government and tech.”